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BROME SEED

Bosir Alaska Brome
Also called Sitka bromegrass, Alaska brome has several characteristics which distinguish it from Smooth bromegrass. Alaska brome exhibits better regrowth than Smooth brome. More importantly, Alaska brome doesn't spread by rhizomes, making it a better choice for mixing with other grasses and legumes than Smooth brome. Compared to smooth brome, Bosir has a higher palatability and higher forage quality. Bosir can be easily substituted for smooth brome in any mixture. The typical problem of smooth brome dominating any other species is remedied by using Alaska brome. Bosir is well suited to environments with harsh winters.
Seeding rate 15 lbs/acre.


Annual Bromegrass
The annual bromegrass become prominent when they replace perennial grasses depleted by overgrazing. In some areas they are a major source of forage during short periods in the spring. Matured seeds of many of the annual bromegrass have awns which may constitute hazards to grazing animals.
Seeding rate 10 to 20 lbs/acre.

Field Brome
A winter annual with an extensive fibrous root system. It is adapted to an area from the Corn Belt eastward. Grows late in fall and for long periods in the spring. It is most valuable for winter cover as a 003366 manure crop.
Seeding rate 10 to 20 lbs/acre.


Meadow Brome
Meadow brome is a long-lived cool-season perennial for either irrigated or non-irrigated pastures. Regar meadow bromegrass is a relatively early maturing bunchgrass with moderate spread and good regrowth. Its persistant sod makes it an excellent grass for erosion control.
Seeding rate 10 to 20 lbs/acre.


Mountain Brome
is a short-lived perennial cool-season sod-type grass with good seeding vigor. Leafy growth and deep, well-branched root system give protection on erodible slopes. Bromar mountain brome combines well with red or sweet clovers in short rotations. Uses primarily for erosion control at higher elevations and higher rainfall areas.
Seeding rate 10 to 20 lbs/acre.


Smooth Brome
Smooth brome is a leafy sod-forming perennial which spreads by underground rhizomes. Forage quality compares well with other cool-season forage grasses. Palatability and nutritive value rank very high. Adapted to the north half of the U.S. and Southern Canada. Used extensively for hay, silage, and erosion control from the Corn Belt to the Rocky Mountains, but is not widely used on the western slope. Prefers deep clay loams soils with neutral or acid pH levels. Tolerates moderately saline soil conditions.
Seeding rate 16 to 20 lbs/acre.


"Deborah" Sweet Brome
Deborah Sweet brome a break through in plant breeding that it arguable deserves a new species name. This special grass variety has a good winter hardiness and good drought tolerance. It can be grown in mixtures with legumes and many grass species if intermediate to late heading varieties are chosen. Compared to species like Orchardgrass, Fescue and Timothy, Deborah has a higher soluble sugar content which makes it very palatable. Deborah has forage quality that is superior to other brome varieties. Unlike smooth brome which has rhizomes, Deborah is a bunchgrass which means that it won't spread and crowd out other grasses and legumes in a mixed stand. Deborah can readily replace Smooth Brome or Orchardgrass in mixtures.

Deborah is good for grazing and excellent for hay, silage and 003366 chop. It is not recommended for overseeding or frost seeding.
Seeding rate 10 to 15 lbs/acre.

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