Turf Seed, Forage Seed, and much more seed Retail Sales
Seed Frequently Asked Questions
NTEP

Fact Sheets
Site Map
Seed Production
Buying Seed
USDA Zone Map
Seed Calculator
Retail Stores
Wholesale Nurseries
Vineyards
Golf Courses
Dairy Farms
Tree Farms
Wholesale Login
Presentation
Customer Survey
Turf Suggestions

Adobe Acrobat Reader allows you to view and print the fact sheets.
Wholesale Bailey Seed Information Contact us with your seed Questions Read
 One Stop Seed Shop
PASTURE GRASS The information listed on this page is for information purposes only and does not express or imply that we have these seeds available. Many of these grasses are very difficult to find and product therefore we do not always have them available.

PASTURE GRASSES

PASTURE SEED PLANTING INSTRUCTIONS

Take soil samples of the field and have them tested to determine fertilizer and lime requirements.

Apply fertilizer according to the results of the soil tests.

Cultivate the soil to a depth of at least six inches by plowing, discing or rotovating. Prepare a good seed bed; level, with relatively fine soil particles.

Sow 20 to 25 pounds per acre if drilling and 40 pounds per acre of broadcasting. Drill the seed to a depth of 1/4 inches, or if broadcast, cover the seed to this depth. Firm the seed bed to insure good contact of seeds and soil.

Irrigate as needed to maintain soil moisture. The new seeding should not be allowed to dry until the seedlings are well rooted.

Do not graze the pasture until the plants have become established.

PASTURE GRASSES

Big Bluegrass (Poa ampla): A cool-season bunchgrass native to the U.S. Very early spring growth, leafy, erect, long-lived perennial which is drought resistant. Fine stemmed, erect and palatable. Should not be grazed for first 2 years; damaged by overgrazing. Growth starts early in the spring and is ready for grazing a month earlier than crested wheatgrass. Needs 11 to 12 inches annual rainfall for maximum forage production. Adapted and used in Pacific Northwest, east of the Cascades, and in the northern intermountain region, on light-textured soils and for reseeding burned over forest lands.
Fertilizer: Low requirement
Seed Count:
880,000 to 920,000
Seeding Rate:
6 to 8 lb/acre Seeding Time: March 1 to May 1

Germination: 14 to 28 days

Mature Height: 16 to 36 inches

Bulbous Bluegrass (Poa bulbosa): A cool-season bunchgrass; used for winter pasture and erosion control. Leafy, tall, late-maturing short-lived perennial. Provides good ground cover at elevations under 4,000 feet. Dormant during hot summers. Seed is not readily available.

Canby Bluegrass (Poa canbyi): Vigorous, long-lived leafy bunchgrass with excellent early spring growth. Relatively low growing, this grass is adapted to short-season areas, and does well on shallow soils. The seed matures in mid-June, plants then become dormant until fall rains begin.

Canada Bluegrass (Poa compressa): Canada Bluegrass is a cool-season sod-forming grass probably native to Eurasia. Used for pasture and erosion control in the Northern U.S. Adapted to open, poorer, dry soils. Needs10 inches annual rainfall. Withstands heavy grazing. Resembles Kentucky bluegrass, but has a distinctive blue-003366 foliage, matures later. Makes little regrowth after grazing. Not as desirable for turf. Good choice for planting roadsides, landfills, reclamation areas, pipeline backfills, ski slopes, sams and dikes. Persistent ground cover under low maintenance. Withstands extremes of drought and cold with a minimum of 20 inches annual rainfall.
Fertility: Low Requirement
Seed Count:
2,200,000 to 2,500,000 per pound
Seeding Rate:
15-20 lb/acre
Seeding Time:
March 1 to April 15 and September 1 - November 1

Germination: 14 to 28 days Mature height: 12 to 20 inches

Kentucky Bluegrass (Poa pratensis): Troy is a coarse, tall pasture bluegrass variety with fast recovery, better for grazing than common kentucky. Adapted to cold climates.

Nevada Bluegrass (Poa nevadensis): A perennial tufted bunchgrass found on plains, open hillsides, foothills, and both wet and dry meadows. It is most commonly fond on drier sites east of the Cascades. It is an excellent forage for range livestock and for game animals. The feeding value is equal to timothy, but production seldom exceeds one tome per acre on most meadows, and much less on drier soils. Withstands light spring and fall grazing, but heavy grazing will destroy a stand.
Mature Height: 18 - 24 inches

Sandberg Bluegrass (Poa sandbergii): A cool-season, native bunchgrass distributed widely throughout the western U.S. Drought tolerant, salt and alkali tolerant. Excellent for revegetation of mined lands.

Field Brome (Bromus arvensis): A winter annual with an extensive fibrous root system. It is adapted to an area from the Corn Belt eastward. Grows late in the fall and for long periods in te spring. It is most valuable for winter cover and as a 003366 manure crop.
Seeding Time: Late Summer

Meadow Brome (Bromus bilbersteinii): Meadow brome is a long-lived cool-season perennial for either irrigated or non-irrigated pastures. Regar meadow bromegrass is a relatively early maturing bunchgrass with moderate spread and good re-growth. Its persistent sod makes it an excellent grass for erosion control.
Seed Count: 71,000 per pound Seeding Rate: 10 to 20 lb/acre

Mountain Brome (Bromus marginatus): Mountain brome is a short-lived perennial cool-season sod-type grass with good seedling vigor. Leafy growth and dep, well-branched root system give protection on erodible slopes. Bromar mountain brome combines well with red or sweet clovers in short rotations. Used primarily for erosion control at higher elevation and higher rainfall areas.
Seed Count: 71,000 per pound Seeding Rate: 10 to 20 lbs/acre

Smooth Brome (Bromus inermis): Smooth brome is a leafy sod-forming perennial which spreads by underground rhizomes. Forage quality compares well with other cool-season forage grasses. palatability and nutritive value rank very high. Adapted to the northern half of the U.S. and southern Canada. Used extensively for hay, silage and erosion control from the Corn Belt to the Rocky Mountains, but is not widely used on the western slope. Prefers deep clay loam soils with neutral or acid pH levels. Tolerates moderately saline soil conditions.
Fertilizer: 40 to 100 lbs of actual nitrogen per acre for best production.
Seed Count:
125,000 to 140,000 per pound
Seeding Rate:
16 to 20 lbs/acre
Seeding Time:
March 15 to May 15
Germination:
7 to 14 days

Annual Bromegrass: The annual bromegrasses become prominent when they replace perennial grasses depleted by overgrazing. In some areas they are a major source of forage during short periods in the spring. Matured seeds of many annual bromegrasses have awns which may constitute hazards to grazing animals.
Some of the widespread winter annuals are:

Tall Fescue (Festuca arundinacea): A cool-season, deep-rooted, long-lived perennial bunchgrass. Thick stands will produce a tough sod if mowed or grazed. Vigorous, grows well on wet and dry soils, does best on heavy soils. Tolerant of poor drainage, is also drought resistant; tolerant of both strongly acid and strongly alkaline soils. Excellent for summer pasture and hay, also for erosion control. Yields well in areas of at least 18 inches of annual effective precipitation. Produces abundantly with irrigation and high fertility. Best seeded with legume for added palatability and nutrition levels. Some palatability loss as plants mature. While a vigorous plant, new seedlings are somewhat slow to establish. Should not be grazed too soon, and not the first winter. Adapted to wide range of climatic conditions. Widely used in Southeastern U.S., in the transition zone between cool-season and warm-season grasses, western Oregon and Washington, and in irrigated areas of most other states.

Meadow Fescue (Festuca elatior): Smaller plant than tall fescue. Cool-season bunchgrass, grows well on moist, fertile, deep soils. Can be grown in same areas as timothy. Primarily use in U.S. is in pasture mixtures for wetlands. Chief limiting factor is high susceptibility to leaf rusts. Cold tolerant. Short-lived perennial. Due to problem with rust, has been replaced with tall fescues.
Seed Count: 220,240,000
Seeding Rate:
20 to 25 lbs/acre
Seeding Time:
March 15 to May 15 and September 15 to October 15
Germination:
10 to 14 days
Mature height:
24 to 36 inches

Arizona Fescue (Festuca arizonica): A native, cool-season perennial bunchgrass, found on dry, shallow soils in the southern intermountain area. While it is an important forage grass in northern Arizona, it becomes rather tough and less palatable with maturity. Drought tolerant, this is a valuable grass for erosion control where adapted.

Red Fescue (Festuca rubra): Cool-season sod forming perennial grass with weak rhizomes, used for turf, pasture and for erosion control. Slowly competitive, prefers acidic soil condition. Prefers moist, cool areas, grows over wide range of soil types. Valuable for shade tolerance, especially when used as an orchard cover crop or for lawns. Not highly palatable. When mature, leaves tend to fall over, giving a "meadow" appearance.
Seed Count: 500,000 to 615,000

Seeding Rate: 15 to 20 lb/acre

Seeding Time: March 1 to May 15 and September 1 to October 15

Germination: 14 to 28 days

Mature Height: 12 to 20 inches

Idaho Fescue (Festuca idahoensis): Cool-season perennial, densely tufted native bunchgrass with erect growth habit. Cold and drought tolerant. Prevalent at higher elevations in Montana, Utah and Idaho, growing primarily in elevations from 1,000 to 9,000 feet. Found from Washington and Montana south to central California and Colorado. Valuable rangegrass, palatable in spring, cures well on stem, makes good fall forage, but has poor seed production. Light grazing only for first 2 to 3 years. Olive to dark 003366, fine, stiff leaves with extensive and deep root system.
Seeding Rate: 6 to 8 PLS lbs/acre (seed " deep)
Seeding Time: Early fall or early spring
Germination: 8 to 10 days
Mature Height: 20 to 40 inches

Sheep Fescue (Festuca ovina): Durable turfgrass on sandy soils, used for erosion control. Cool-season bunchgrass, cold and drought tolerant. More drought tolerant than other fine-leaved fescues. Succeeds on sandy, gravelly soils. Not widely used for pastures. Dense grower, heavy root system. Adapted to dry sites, high altitudes, 10 to 14 inches of annual effective precipitation.
Seed Count: 670,000 to 690,000
Seeding Rate:
6 to 8 lbs/acre

Hard Fescue (Festuca ovina): Cool-season long-lived dense rooted bunchgrass useful in erosion control and soil improvement. Adapted to well-drained medium-acid to mildly alkaline soils, annual precipitation of 12 inches or more. Slow to establish; used for both conservation and grazing. Tougher leaves and less drought tolerant than sheep fescue. Readily grazed, especially by sheep.
Seed Count: 600,000 to 680,000 per pound
Seeding Rate:
6 to 8 lbs/acre
Seeding Time:
April 15 to May 15
Germination:
7 to 14 days
Mature Height:
8 to 16 inches

Meadow Foxtail (Alopecurus pratensis): A cool-season, slightly spreading, weak, sod-forming grass, not drought hardy or resistant to high temperatures. matures earlier than timothy, which it resembles when headed out. Growth begins early in spring. A long-lived perennial, it is especially adapted to low, poorly drained soils and land which floods in winter and early spring. It is also adapted to higher altitudes and Alaska. Seed shatters excessively. Highly palatable as either pasture or hay. Responds to high fertility levels. Often seeded with big trefoil or ladino clover for lowland pastures. Light, fluffy seed is extremely difficult to handle, process and seed. Seed is scarce and relatively expensive. Germination percentage of seed may drop rapidly.

Creeping Meadow Foxtail (Alopecurus arundinacea) Creeping meadow foxtail is a cool-season, long lived, sod-forming and creeping grass used for hay, pasture and erosion control. It is found in moist areas of the Pacific Northwest, the Northern Great Plains, and in the intermountain region. Resembles common meadow foxtail but has stronger rhizomes, and because of these, it forms a dense sod. This grass is well adapted to wetland pastures, bottom ground, and is especially adapted to mountain meadows in Eastern Oregon. Produces good yields of high quality, palatable forage. It mixes well with other grasses and legumes.

Orchardgrass (Dactylis glomerata) A cool-season, tall, long-lived, rapidly growing bunchgrass. It is adapted to well-drained soils, and has the ability to stand relatively poor soils. Develops rapidly in spring. If adequately fertilized, production is distributed well through the growing season. Withstands both heat and drought, and is shade tolerant. Prefers neutral to higher pH, needs lime on acid soils. It is suited for hay, pasture and erosion control. Adapted to areas from eastern Great Plains to New England, and to irrigated areas and high-rainfall mountains of the Pacific Northwest. Generally needs 16 inches of annual effective precipitation.
Fertilizer: Responds well to nitrogen fertilizer. Becomes very competitive when nutrients are available.

Seed Count: 420,000 to 590,000 per pound
Seeding Rate:
18 to 25 lbs/acre
Seeding Time:
March 1 to May 15 and September 1 to November 1
Germination:
10 to 21 days
Mature Height:
28 to 50 inches

Redtop (Agrostis alba) Redtop is a perennial sod-forming grass related to creeping bentgrass, but is shorter-lived. It grows on very acid to neutral soils, poorly drained land, and on soils of low fertility. It can withstand short summer drought periods. Used primarily on poor or wet land for hay and pasture, most often mixed with other grasses or legumes. It is less palatable than other grasses adapted to wetlands. Less aggressive than bluegrass or fescue; it can provide a dense, low-growing cover. Adapted to much of U.S. except drier areas and the South. Matures from mid-June to mid-August. Seed heads are reddish in color. Relatively little seed production, due to strong tendency to shattering and low demand for seed.
Fertilizer: While Redtop produces fair yields on unproductive soil, hay yields are increased with liming and fertilizing. Seed Count: 5,000,000 per pound
Seeding Rate:
8 to 10 lbs/acre
Seeding Time:
March 1 to May 20 and September 15 to November 1
Germination:
7 to 14 days
Mature Height:
18 to 30 inches

Tall Oatgrass (Arrhenatherum elatius) under favorable conditions, a long-lived, upright bunchgrass suited to cool moist climates. Generally a short-lived grass. Does not withstand heavy grazing. Needs good drainage. Not winter-hardy. Grown in Pacific Northwest, New England and North-Central states. Leafy and palatable, it mixes well with legumes adapted to the same growing conditions. Matures and produces seedheads during the growing season. Seed shatters and seed processing is difficult. Very little seed available.
Seed Count: 140,000 to 190,000 per pound
Seeding Rate:
40 to 50 lbs/acre
Seeding Time:
March 1 to May 15 and September 15 to November 1
Germination:
10 to 14 days
Mature Height: 36 to 60 inches

Reed Canarygrass (Phalaris arundinacea) A tall, coarse, cool-season dos-forming perennial. In thin stands will form a large clump. Spreads by short rhizomes which may form a heavy sod in well-managed seedings. Well adapted to poorly drained soils subject to flooding. Can withstand continuous flooding for 2 months in cool weather. It invades wet areas along ditch banks or canals. It is frost tolerant; may be grown on drier upland soils. Not adapted to saline soils. Tolerates pH range of 4.9 to 8.2. Mature plants of common reed canarygrass lack palatability. Palatability of immature stands ranks near that of bromegrass. Improved varieties are more palatable. For best quality pasture, should be grazed at heights between 12 to 24 inches.
Fertilizer: Yields continue to increase with split applications of 180 lbs of actual nitrogen per acre per year with both P and K when needed.

Seed Count: 500,000 to 540,000 per pound
Seeding Rate:
6 to 8 lbs/acre
Seeding Time:
April 15 to June 1 and September 1 to October 1
Germination:
14 to 21 days
Mature Height: 48 to 90 inches

Hardinggrass (Phalaris aquatica) A cool-season perennial grown in Southwest and Southeast of the United States for winter pasture and hay. Called Toowooba canarygrass in Australia.
Seed Count: 350,000 to 360,000 per pound

Canarygrass (Phalaris canariensis) An annual grass, grown for the seed which is used for bird food. The name should be not confused with reed canarygrass, which is a perennial grass.

Perennial Ryegrass (Lolium perenne) An important cool-season bunchgrass well adapted in the Pacific Northwest. Relatively short-lived perennial grass often used on lowlands, soils with poor drainage, and on acid soils. Adapted to a wide range of soil conditions west of the Cascades. Can be grown under irrigation or on dryland areas with a minimum of 15 inches effective annual precipitation east of the cascades. Does best in cool-moist regions with mild winters; grows well on heavy soils; tolerates heavy grazing. Widely used in mixtures for pasture, hay, erosion control and for rough lawns. Tends to go dormant in summer months. Nutritious and palatable. Germinates very rapidly. Newly seeded pastures may be grazed within two months of seeding.
Fertilizer: Yield, protein and digestible organic matter improve with nitrogen applications of 25 to 100 lbs per acre.

Seed Count: 210,000 to 250,000 per pound
Seeding Rate:
20 to 25 lbs/acre
Seeding Time:
March 1 to June 15 and September 15 to November 1
Germination:
7 to 14 days (less with optimum conditions)

Annual Ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum): A major cool-season, vigorous bunchgrass grown primarily in the Pacific Coast states west of the Cascades. Also used for over-seeding warm season turfgrasses and as a winter annual in the southern U.S. Adapted to a wide variety of soil conditions. Palatable, tolerates heavy grazing. used for pasture, hay, silage, cover crop, temporary lawns, and short-term erosion control. Rapid germination and establishment, tolerates heavy soils, low pH ranges, and poor drainage. Needs an effective annual precipitation of 12 inches or more.
Fertilizer: Yield, protein and digestible organic matter improve with nitrogen applications of 25 to 100 lbs per acre. Seed Count: 190,000 to 230,000 per pound
Seeding Rate:
20 to 25 lbs/acre
Seeding Time:
March 1 to June 15 and September 15 to November 1
Germination:
7 to 10 days

Tetraploid Ryegrass: Normal varieties of both perennial and annual ryegrasses contain seven pairs of chromosomes, and are referred to as diploid ryegrasses. When the chromosome numbers are doubled, the resulting ryegrass is referred to as a Tetraploid ryegrass. Generally the Tetraploid ryegrasses are more vigorous, more leafy, more drought resistant and more palatable than the diploid varieties.

Hybrid Ryegrass (Lolium hybridum): A hybrid, the result of a cross of perennial and annual ryegrasses. has similar performance to perennial ryegrass, shows seedling vigor equal to annual ryegrass. Has performed well in erosion control seedings. Seed has not been readily available.

Sudangrass (Sorghum bicolor): Warm-season annual grass used for silage, 003366-chop, 003366 manure, pasture for hay. Palatable and nutritious. Some varieties have high levels of prussic acid after frost or stress. Drought resistant, needs 16 to 25 inches of annual precipitation. Production more with more rainfall or under irrigation. Requires warm seedbed. Yields well in summer under warm conditions. Rapid growth, reaches hay stage in 75 to 90 days. Wide adaptation, grown from North Dakota to Texas and from Oregon to Florida.
NOTE: the prussic acid content of Sudangrass may increase in new growth following a frost, or under wet conditions, particularly west of the Cascades.
Seed Count: 54,000 to 56,000 per pound
Seeding Rate:
25 to 30 lbs/acre
Seeding Time:
May 1 to June 15; after soil is warmed up.
Germination:
7 to 14 days
Mature Height:
36 to 80 inches

Timothy (Phleum pratense): One of the earliest grasses known in the U.S. A short-lived, winter-hardy perennial bunchgrass, it is often seeded in a mixture with alfalfa, clover or Birdsfoot trefoil Adapted to high elevations and to areas of at least 18 inches of effective annual precipitation. Easy to establish, easy to handle for hay. Well known as prime horse hay crop. Used extensively for revegetation of forest land and for erosion control in many areas. Adapted to the fertile, moist, medium-heavy soils of the Pacific Northwest, and to the Great Lakes to the New England states.

Some dwarf or slower growing varieties of turf type perennial ryegrass have been developed as well.

ANNUAL RYEGRASS (Lolium multiflorum): Developing a lush, healthy lawn requires the correct selection of grasses for the various climate and soil conditions, and for the intended use of the lawn. Many factors should be considered in the selection of the kind of grass to use. This chart gives a rapid overview of some characteristics of grasses used in the Pacific Northwest.

Water: Medium requirement; shows stress rapidly.

Fertilizer: Minimum of 4 to 5 pounds actual nitrogen per 1,000 square feet per year. Viability and color improved with 8 to 10 pounds of actual nitrogen per 1,000 square feet per year. Generally, to 1 pound actual nitrogen per 1,000 square feet per growing month.

Seed count: 210,000 to 250,000 per pound

Seeding rate: 8 to 10 pounds per 1,000 square feet.

Seeding times: September 1 to November 15; March 1 to June 1

Germination: 5 to 10 days

Mowing: Cut at 1/ inches to 2 inches. Some varieties will tolerate 3/4 inch height. Keep mower sharp for best results.

Big Bluegrass (Poa ampla): A cool season bunchgrass native to the U.S. Very early spring growth, leafy, erect, long-lived perennial which is drought resistant. Fine stemmed, erect and palatable. Should not be grazed for the first two years; damaged by overgrazing. Growth starts early in the spring and is ready for grazing a month earlier than crested wheatgrass. Needs 11 to 12 inches annual rainfall for maximum forage production. Adapted and used in Pacific Northwest, east of the Cascades, and in the northern intermountain region, on light-textured soils and for reseeding burned over forest lands.

Fertilizer: Low requirement

Seed count: 880,000 to 920,000

Seeding rate: 6 to 8 pounds per acre

Seeding time: march 1 to May 1

Germination: 14 to 28 days

Mature height: 16 to 36 inches

BULBOUS BLUEGRASS (Poa bulbosa): Cool season bunchgrass; used for winter pasture and erosion control. Leafy, tall, late-maturing short lived perennial. Provides good ground cover at elevations under 4,000 feet. Dormant during hot summers. Seed is not readily available.

CANBY BLUEGRASS (Poa canbyi): Vigorous, long lived leafy bunchgrass with excellent early spring growth. Relatively low growing, this grass is adapted to short season areas, and does well on shallow soils. The seed matures in mid-June, plants then become dormant until fall rains begin. A recently developed cultivar selected for vigor, adaptability and seed production is Canbar.

CANADA BLUEGRASS (Poa compressa): Canada Bluegrass is a cool season cod forming grass probably native to Eurasia. Used for pasture and erosion control in the northern U.S. Adapted to open, poorer, dry soils. Needs 10" annual rainfall. Withstands heavy grazing. Resembles Kentucky Bluegrass, but has a distinctive blue-003366 foliage, matures later. Makes little regrowth after grazing. Not as desirable for turf. Good choice for planting roadsides, landfills, reclamation areas, pipeline backfills, ski slopes, dams and dikes. Persistent ground cover under low maintenance. Withstands extremes of drought and cold with a minimum of 20 inches annual rainfall.

Fertility: Low requirement

Seed count: 2,200,000 to 2,500,000 per pound

Seeding rate: 15 - 20 pounds per acre

Seeding time: September 1 to November 1 and March 1 to April 15

Germination: 14 to 28 days

Mature height: 12 - 20 inches

KENTUCKY BLUEGRASS ( Poa pratensis): Troy is a coarse, tall pasture bluegrass variety with fast recovery, better for grazing then common kentucky. Adapted to cold climates.

NEVADA BLUEGRASS (Poa nevadensis): A perennial tufted bunchgrass found on plains, open hillsides, foothills, and both wet and dry meadows. It is most commonly found on drier sites east of the Cascades. It is an excellent forage for range livestock and for game animals. The feeding value is equal to timothy, but production seldom exceeds one ton per acre on most meadows, and much less on drier soils. Withstands light spring and fall grazing, but heavy grazing will destroy a stand.

Mature height: 18 - 24 inches

SANDBURG BLUEGRASS (Poa sandbergii): A cool season, native bunchgrass distributed widely throughout the western U.S. Drought tolerant, salt and alkali tolerant. Excellent for revegetation of mined lands.

FIELD BROME (Bromus arvensis): A winter annual with an extensive fibrous root system. It is adapted to an area from the Corn Belt eastward. Grows late in the fall and for long periods in the spring. It is most valuable for winter cover and as a 003366 manure crop.

Seeding time: Late summer

MEADOW BROME (Bromus bilbersteinii): Meadow brome is a long lived cool season perennial for either irrigated or non irrigated pastures. Regar meadow bromegrass is a relatively early maturing bunchgrass with moderate spread and good regrowth. Its persistent sod makes it an excellent grass for erosion control.

MOUNTAIN BROME (Bromus marginatus): Mountain brome is a hort lived perennial cool season sod type grass with good seedling vigor. Leafy growth and deep, well branched root system give protection on erodible slopes. Bromar mountain brome combines well with red or sweet clover in short rotations. Used primarily for erosion control at higher elevations and higher rainfall areas.

Seed count: 71,000 per pounds

Seeding rate: 10 to 20 pounds per acre

SMOOTH BROME (Bromus inermis): Smooth brome is a leafy sod forming perennial which spreads by underground rhizomes. Forage quality compares well with other cool season forage grasses. Palatability and nutritive value rank very high. Adapted to the northern half of the U.S. and souther Canada. Used extensively for hay, silage and erosion control from the Corn Belt to the Rocky Mountains, but is not widely used on the western slope. Prefers deep clay loam soils with neutral and acid pH levels. Tolerates moderately saline soil conditions.

Fertilizer: 40 to 100 pounds of actual nitrogen per acre for best production.

Seed count: 125,000 to 140,000 per pound

Seeding rate: 16 to 20 pounds per acre

Seeding time: march 15 to may 15

Germination: 7 to 14 days

ANNUAL BROMEGRASSES : The annual bromegrasses become prominent when they replace perennial grasses depleted by overgrazing. In some areas they are a major source of forage during short periods in the spring. Matured seeds of many of the annual bromegrasses have awns which may constitute hazards to grazing animals.

TALL FESCUE (Festuca arundinacea): A cool season, deep rooted, long lived perennial bunchgrass. Thick stands will produce a tough sod if mowed or grazed. Vigorous, grows well on wet and dry soils, does best on heavy soils. Tolerant of poor drainage, is also drought resistant; tolerant of both strongly acid and strongly alkaline soils. Excellent for summer pasture and hay, also for erosion control. Yields well in areas of at least 18 inches of annual effective precipitation. Produces abundantly with irrigation and high fertility. Best seeded with legume for added palatability and nutrition levels. Some palatability loss as plants mature. While a vigorous plant, new seedlings are somewhat slow to establish. Should not be grazed too soon, and not the first winter. Adapted to wide range of climatic conditions. Widely used in South eastern U.S., in the transition zone between cool season and warm season grasses, western Oregon and Washington, and in irrigated areas of most other states.

Fertilizer: Responds readily to high rates of nitrogen. In mixtures with legumes, liming phosphate and potash applications are recommended.

Seed count: 200,000 to 230,000

Seeding rate: 20 to 25 pounds per acre

Seeding time: September 15 to November 1 and March 15 to May 15

Germination: 7 to 14 days

Mature height: 30 to 72 inches

NOTE: Research has found that fescue toxicosis in cattle and horses is highly associated with the presence of an endophytic fungus. Most newer varieties of tall fescue are now being tested for endophyte fungus. Seed lots free of endophyte fungus are labeled with a 003366 tag issued by the Oregon Department of Agriculture.

MEADOW FESCUE (Festuca elatior): Smaller plant than tall fescue. Cool season bunchgrass, grows well on moist, fertile, deep soils. Can be grown in same areas as timothy. Primary use in U.S. is in pasture mixtures for wetlands. Chief limiting factor is high susceptibility to leaf rusts. Cold tolerant, short lived perennial. Because of problem with rust, has been replaced with tall fescues.

Seed count: 220,000 to 240,000

Seeding rate: 20-25 pounds per acre

Seeding time: September 15 to October 15 and March 15 to May 15

Germination: 10 to 14 days

Mature height: 24 to 36 inches

ARIZONA FESCUE (Festuca arizonica): A native, cool season perennial bunchgrass, found on dry, shallow soils in the southern Intermountain area. While it is an important forage grass in northern Arizona, it becomes rather tough and less palatable with maturity. Drought tolerant, this is a valuable grass for erosion control where adapted.

RED FESCUE (Festuca rubra): Cool season sod forming perennial grass with weak rhizomes, used for turf, pasture and for erosion control. Slowly competitive, prefers acidic soils condition. Prefers moist, cool areas, grows on a wide range of soil types. Valuable for shade tolerance, especially when used as an orchard cover crop or for lawns. Not highly palatable. When mature, leaves tend to fall over, giving a "meadow" appearance.

Seed count: 500,000 to 615,000 per pound

Seeding rate: 15 to 20 pounds per acre

Seeding time: September 1 to October 15 and March 1 to May 15

Germination: 14 to 28 days

Mature height: 12 to 20 inches

IDAHO FESCUE (Festuca idahoensis): Cool season perennial, densely tufted native bunchgrass with erect growth habit. Cold and drought tolerant. Prevalent at higher elevations in Montana, Utah and Idaho, growing primarily in elevations from 1000 to 9000 feet. Found from Washington and Montana south to central California and Colorado. Valuable rangegrass, palatable in spring, cures well on stem, makes good fall forage, but has poor seed production. Light grazing only for first 2 to 3 years. Olive to dark 003366 fine, stiff leaves with extensive and deep root system.

Seeding rate: 6 to 8 pounds pure live seed per acre (seed 1/4" deep).

Seeding time: Early fall or Early spring

Germination: 8 to 10 days

Mature height: 20 to 40 inches

SHEEPS FESCUE (Festuca ovina): Durable turfgrass on sandy soils, used for erosion control. Cool season bunchgrass, cold and drought tolerant. More drought tolerant than other fine leaved fescues. Succeeds on sandy, gravelly soils. Not widely used for pastures. Dense grower, heavy root system. Adapted to dry sites, high altitudes, 10 to 14 inches of annual effective precipitation.

Seed count: 670,000 to 690,000 seeds per pound

Seeding rate: 6 to 8 pounds per acre

HARD FESCUE (Fescua ovina var. duriuscula): Cool season long lived dense rooted bunchgrass useful in erosion control and soil improvement. Adapted to well drained medium acid to mildly alkaline soils, annual precipitation of 12 inches or more. Slow to establish; used for bother conservation and grazing. Tougher leaves and less drought tolerant than sheep fescue. Readily grazed, especially by sheep.

Seed count: 600,000 to 680,000 seeds per pound

Seeding rate: 6 to 8 pounds per acre

Seeding time: April 15 to May 15

Germination: 7 to 14 days

Mature height: 8 to 16 inches.

MEADOW FOXTAIL (Alopecurus pratensis): A cool season slightly spreading, weak, sod forming grass, not drought hardy or resistant to high temperatures. Matures earlier than timothy, which it resembles when headed out. Growth begins early in spring. A long lived perennial, it is especially adapted to low, poorly drained soils and land which floods in winter and early spring. It is also adapted to higher altitudes and Alaska. Seed shatters excessively. Highly palatable as either pasture or hay. Responds to high fertility levels. Often seeded with big trefoil or ladino clover for lowland pastures. Light, fluffy seed is extremely difficult to handle, process and seed. Seed is scarce and relatively expensive. Germination percentage of seed may drop rapidly.

Seed count: 540,000 to 600,000 seeds per pound

Seeding rate: 12 to 18 pounds per acre

Seeding times: September 15 to November 1 and March 1 to June 1

Germination: 10 to 21 days

Mature height: 15 to 30 inches

CREEPING MEADOW FOXTAIL (Alopecurus arundinaces): Creeping meadow foxtail is a cool season, long lived, sod forming and creeping grass used for hay, pasture and erosion control. It is found in moist areas of the Pacific Northwest, the northern Great Plains, and in the intermountain region. Resembles common meadow foxtail but has strong rhizomes, and because of these, it forms a dense sod. This grass is well adapted to mountain meadows in Eastern Oregon. Produces good yields of high quality, palatable forage. It mixes well with other grasses and legumes.

ORCHARDGRASS (Dactylis glomerata): A cool season, tall, long lived, rapidly growing bunchgrass. It is adapted to well drained soil, and has the ability to stand relatively poor soils. Develops rapidly in the spring. If adequately fertilized, production is distributed well through the growing season. Withstands both heat and drought, and is shade tolerant. Prefers neutral to higher pH, needs lime on acid soils. It is suited for hay, pasture and erosion control. Adapted to areas from eastern Great Plains to New England, and to irrigated areas and high rainfall mountains of the Pacific Northwest. Generally needs 16 inches of annual effective precipitation.

Fertilizer: Responds well to nitrogen fertilizer. Becomes very competitive when nutrients are available.

Seed count: 420,000 to 590,000 seeds per pound

Seeding rate: 18 to 25 pounds per acre

Seeding time: September 1 to November 1 and march 1 to May 15

Germination: 10 to 21 days

Mature height: 28 to 50 inches

REDTOP (Agrostis alba): Redtop is a perennial sod forming grass related to creeping bentgrass, but is shorter lived. It grows on very acid to neutral soils, poorly drained land, and on soils of low fertility. It can withstand short summer drought periods. Used primarily on poor or wet land for hay and pasture, most often mixed with other grasses or legumes. It is less palatable than other grasses adapted to wetlands. Less aggressive than bluegrass or fescue; it can provide a dense, low growing cover. Adapted to much of U.S. except drier areas and the South. Matures from mid June to mid August. Seed heads are reddish in color. Relatively little seed production, due to strong tendency to shattering and low demand for seed.

Fertilizer: While redtop produces fair yields on unproductive soil, hay yields are increased with liming and fertilizing.

Seed count: Approximately 5,000,000 seeds per pound

Seeding rate: 8 to 10 pounds per acre

Seeding times: September 15 to November 1 and March 1 to May 20

Germination: 7 to 14 days

Mature height: 18 to 30 inches

TALL OATGRASS (Arrhenatherum elatuis): Under favorable conditions, a long lived, upright bunchgrass suited to cool moist climates. Generally a short lived grass. Does not withstand heavy grazing. Needs good drainage. Not winter hardy. Grow in Pacific Northwest, new England and North Central States. Leafy and palatable, it mixes well with legumes adapted to the same growing conditions. Matures and produces seed heads during the growing season. Seed shatters and seed processing is difficult. Very little seed available. Tualatin tall Oatgrass is a finer stemmed, shorter, leafier and alter maturing variety.

Seed count: 140,000 to 190,000 seeds per pound

Seeding rate: 40 to 50 pounds per acre

Seeding time: September 15 to November 1 and March 1 to May 15

Germination: 10 to 14 days

Mature height: 36 to 60 inches

REED CANARYGRASS (Phalaris arundinacea): A tall, coarse, cool season sod forming perennial. In thin stands will form a large clump. Spreads by short rhizomes which may form a heavy sod in well managed seeding. Well adapted to poorly drained soils subject to flooding. Can withstand continuous flooding for 2 months in cool weather. It invades wet areas along ditch banks or canals. It is frost tolerant; may be grown on drier upland soils. Not adapted to saline soils. Tolerates pH range of 4.9 to 8.2. Mature plants of common reed canarygrass lock palatability. Palatability of immature stands ranks near that of bromegrass. Improved varieties are more palatable. For best quality pasture, should be grazed at heights between 12 and 24 inches.

Fertilizer: Yields continue to increase with split application os 180 pounds of actual nitrogen per acre per year with both P and K when needed.

Seed count: 500,000 to 540,000 seeds per pound

Seeding rate: 6 to 8 pounds per acre

Seeding time: September 1 to October 1 and April 15 to June 1

Germination: 14 to 21 days.

Mature height: 48 to 90 inches

HARDINGGRASS (Phalaris aquatica ): A cool season perennial grown in the Southwest and Southeast of the United States for winter pasture and hay. Cooled Toowoomba canarygrass in Australia.

Seed count: 350,000 to 360,000 seeds per pound

CANARYGRASS (Phalaris canariensis): An annual grass, grown for the seed which is used for bird food. The name should not be confused with reed canarygrass, which is a perennial grass.

PERENNIAL RYEGRASS (Lolium perenne): An important cool season bunchgrass well adapted in the Pacific Northwest. Relatively short lived perennial grass often used on lowlands, soils with poor drainage, and on acid soils. Adapted to a wide range of soil conditions west of the Cascades. Can be grown under irrigation or on dryland areas with a minimum of 15 inches effective annual precipitation east of the Cascades. Does best in cool, moist regions with mild winters; grows well on heavy soils; tolerates heavy grazing. Widely used in mixtures for pasture, hay, erosion control and for rough lawns. Tends to go dormant in summer months. Nutritious and palatable. Germinates very rapidly. Newly seeded pastures may be grazed within tow months of seeding.

Fertilizer: Yield, protein and digestible organic matter improve with nitrogen applications of 25 to 100 lbs per acre.

Seed count: 210,000 to 250,000 seeds per pounds

Seeding rate: 20 to 25 pounds per acre

Seeding time: September 15 to November 1 and March 1 to June 15

Germination: 7 to 14 days

ANNUAL RYEGRASS (Lolium multiflorum): A major cool season, vigorous bunchgrass grown primarily in the Pacific Coast states west of the Cascades. Also used for over seeding warm season turfgrasses and as a winter annual in the souther U.S. Adapted to a wide variety of soil conditions. Palatable, tolerates heavy grazing. Used for pasture, hay, silage, cover crop, temporary lawns. And sort term erosion control. Rapid germination and establishment, tolerates heavy soil, low pH ranges, and poor drainage. Needs an effective annual precipitation of 12 inches or more.

Fertilizer: 25 to 100 pounds of actual nitrogen per acre per year

Seed count: 190,000 to 230,000

Seeding rate: 20 to 25 pounds per acre

Seeding times: September 15 to November 1 and March 1 to June 15

Germination: 7 to 10 days

Italian Ryegrass - Lolium multiflorum (Annual Ryegrass)

English Ryegrass - Lolium perenne (Perennial Ryegrass)

TETRAPLOID RYEGRASS: Normal varieties of both perennial and annual ryegrass contain seven pairs of chromosomes, and are referred to as diploid ryegrass. When the chromosome numbers are doubles, the resulting ryegrass is referred to as a Tetraploid ryegrass. Generally the Tetraploid ryegrass is more vigorous, more leafy, more drought resistant and more palatable than diploid varieties.

HYBRID RYEGRASS (Lolium hybridum): A hybrid, the result of a cross of perennial and annual ryegrass. Has similar performance to perennial ryegrass, shows seedling vigor equal to annual ryegrass. Has performed well in erosion control seedings. Seed has not been readily available.

SUDANGRASS (Sorghum bicolor): Warm season annual grass used for silage, 003366 chop, 003366 manure, pasture and hay. Palatable and nutritious. Some varieties have high levels of prussic acid after frost or stress. Drought resistant, needs 16 to 25 inches of annual precipitation. Produces more with more rainfall or under irrigation. Requires warm seedbed. Yields well in summer under warm conditions. Rapid growth, reaches hay stage in 75 to 90 days. Wide adaptation. Grown in fro North Dakota to Texas and from Oregon to Florida.

Seed count: 54,000 to 56,000 seeds per pound

Seeding rate: 25 to 30 pounds per acre

Seeding times: May 1 to June 15; after soil is warmed up

Germination: 7 to 14 days

Mature height: 36 to 80 inches

NOTE: The prussic acid content of Sudangrass may increase in new growth following a frost, or under wet conditions, particularly west of the Cascades.

TIMOTHY (Phleum pratense): One of the earliest grasses know in the U.S. A short lived winter hardy perennial bunchgrass, it is often seeded in a mixture with alfalfa, clover or Birdsfoot trefoil Adapted to high elevations and to areas of at least 18 inches of effective annual precipitation. Easy to establish, easy to handle for hay. Well known as prime horse hay crop. Used extensively for revegetation of forest land and for erosion control in many areas Adapted to the fertile, moist, medium heavy soils of the Pacific Northwest, and to the Great Lakes to the New England states.

Responds rapidly to fertilization

Seed count: 1,100,000 to 1,300,000 seeds per pound

Seed rate: 8 to 10 pounds per acre

Seeding time: September 15 to November 1 and March 1 to May 15

Germination: 7 to 10 days

Mature height: 30 to 48 inches

WHEATGRASS (Agropyron genus): No other group of closely related grasses is more important than the Wheatgrasses in the West for the production of nutritious early forage. They are excellent for the wind and water erosion control. There are about 150 species of Wheatgrasses distributed throughout the temperate regions of the world, with most of them found in areas of desert or steppe soils under semi humid to arid conditions. They are found from Alaska and Canada to South Africa, with most of the species native to Asia and Europe. The important Wheatgrasses are perennial and are cool season grasses, some bunch type and others sod forming. Since most species of wheatgrass are highly cross pollinated, there is a wide variation within species in plant type and characteristics. The germination of most wheatgrass is rapid, although a few species such as western and tall wheatgrass may not germinate for a month or more.

The most important native Wheatgrasses are:

Western: Grows primarily in the central and northern Great Plains.

Bluebunch: in the northern intermountain region.

Slender: Widespread over mountains, foothills and high plains.

Crested: wheatgrass is the most important introduced species.

Species native to the U.S.:

BEARDLESS WHEATGRASS (Agropyron inerme): Long lived drought tolerant bunchgrass. Sometimes called beardless Bluebunch wheatgrass because of the similarity of its growth habit to Bluebunch wheatgrass, but has very few or no awns (beards0. Some agronomists consider beardless wheatgrass to be an awnless type of Bluebunch wheatgrass. Primarily found in the intermountain region. Adapted to the same areas as crested wheatgrass in the Northwest, but can be grazed later in the season and is more palatable. Low seedling vigor delays establishment.

Seed count: 150,000 seeds per pound

Seeding rate: 6 to 10 pounds per acre

Seeding times: march 15 to May 15

Germination: 21 to 28+ days

Mature height: 12 to 24 inches

Effective annual precipitation needed: 10 to 15 inches

BLUEBUNCH WHEATGRASS (Agropyron spicatum): Long lived drought resistant bunchgrass distributed widely from Alaska south through the western U.S. More drought tolerant than beardless wheatgrass. Withstands proper grazing well, will die out if grazed too early or too hard. Abundant, highly palatable and nutritious forage; also very valuable as a reclamation grass. Beardless wheatgrass is dependable range forage.

Seed count: 90,000 to 100,000 seeds per pound

Seeding rate: 12 to 15 pounds per acre

Seeding times: March 15 to May 15

Mature height: 24 to 48 inches

Effective annual precipitation needed: 8 to 14 inches

SLENDER WHEATGRASS (Agropyron trachycaulum): Important cool season native perennial bunchgrass in northern Great Plains, distributed from Newfoundland to Alaska, and south to Utah and Colorado. More readily established than most grasses because of high germination and vigorous seedlings. Relatively short lived, tolerant to alkali soils, less drought resistant than crested or western wheatgrass. Prefers lighter soils and sandy loams. Seldom found in pure stands, should be seeded in mixtures with other grasses. Usually not awned, the seed head appearance is slender, distinguishing this grass from other Wheatgrasses.

Seed count: 150,000 to 160,000 seeds per pound

Seeding rate: 8 to 10 pounds per acre

Seeding time: March 15 to May 15

Germination: approximately 14 days.

Mature height: 18 to 30 inches

Effective annual precipitation needed: 12 to 18 inches

STREAMBANK WHEATGRASS (Agropyron Riparium): A sod forming, very drought tolerant low growing coarse, perennial grass. Grows in the area from British Columbia and Alberta through Washington and Montana, to Nevada, Utah and Colorado. Strong rhizomes aid rapid spread to form a dense sod which is highly resistant to erosion. Valuable for ground cover, airports, roadside seedings, and is especially useful for controlling erosion of canal banks.

Seed count: 156,000 to 170,000 seeds per pound

Seeding rate: 8 to 10 pounds per acre

Seeding time: march 15 to May 15

Germination: about 14 days

Mature height: 12 to 20 inches

THICKSPIKE WHEATGRASS (Agropyron dasystachyum): Another cool season, low growing, sod forming perennial native bunchgrass, has wider range of distribution than many other Wheatgrasses. Grows readily from Michigan to Nevada, Hudson Bay to Alaska, prevalent in the Pacific Northwest, common in the intermountain region. Does well on light textured or eroded soils, found on dry hillsides, exposed ridges, and benchlands to altitudes of 10,000 feet. Begins growth early in spring, provides good early pasture, but becomes wiry as season advances. More drought tolerant than western wheatgrass. Primary uses include: stabilization of roadsides, airports, recreation areas, reclamation areas and construction sites.

Seed count: 150,000 to 160,000 seeds per pound

Seeding rate: 8 to 10 pounds per acre

Seeding time: March 15 to May 15

Germination: about 14 days

Mature height: 12 to 24 inches

WESTERN WHEATGRASS (Agropyron smithii): A widely distributed, long lived sod forming grass of major importance in the Northern Great Plains. In the northern inter mountain area it is often mixed with Bluebunch and Thickspike Wheatgrasses. It may be found on heavy and alkaline soils in swells, shallow lake beds with some overflow or poor drainage. It can grow through thick layer so if silt and can endure long drought periods. While it is considered an good spring and winter range grass, it should not be grazed too heavily or the stand could disappear. It forms a dense sod which is valuable for erosion control.

Seed count: 105,000 to 115,000 seeds per pound

Seeding rate: 5 to 15 pounds per acre

Seeding times: March 15 to May 15

Effective annual precipitation needed: 10 inches

SPECIES IMPORTED TO THE U.S.:

CRESTED WHEATGRASS (Agropyron desertorum): Also known as standard crested wheatgrass. A hardy, drought resistant, cool season, long lived perennial bunchgrass which tolerates heavy grazing but not prolonged flooding. Slightly more cold, shade and moisture tolerant than Fairway Crested Wheatgrass. Starts growth early in spring, ready to graze areas of 9 to 15 inch annual rainfall, requires 12 inches or more in more southern locations. Grown from the Great Plains to the Cascades and south to Arizona and New Mexico. Does well on most soils, from light sandy loams to heavy clays. Low tolerance to alkali soils. Highly productive, most growth occurs in early spring. Has excellent palatability and nutritive content for early grazing. Used for erosion control on disturbed areas.

Seed count: 175,000 to 190,000 seeds per pound

Seeding rate: 6 to 8 pounds per acre

Seeding times: March 15 to May 15

Germination: 12 to 18 days

Mature height: 8 to 24 inches

Effective annual precipitation needed: 10 to 20 inches

FAIRWAY CRESTED WHEATGRASS (Agropyron cristatum): A cool season drought resistant, slightly rhizomatous, hardy bunchgrass used extensively for pasture and hay in Canada and somewhat in northern Great Plains and Intermountain areas of the U.S. Shorter, more dense, finer stemmed and less productive than crested wheatgrass. More satisfactory for dryland lawns and turf seedings because of more dense growth and finer appearance. Generally adapted to higher altitudes and more moist areas than crested wheatgrass. Fairway crested wheatgrass has a lower forage yield but higher TDN content than crested wheatgrass

Seed count: 175,000 to 200,000

Seeding rate: 6 to 8 pounds per acre

Seeding times: March 15 to May 15

Germination: 12 to 18 days

Mature height: 6 to 18 inches

Effective annual precipitation needed: 9 to 16 inches

INTERMEDIATE WHEATGRASS (Agropyron intermedium): An important cool season sod forming, late maturing perennial grass imported successfully in 1932 from the Caucasus region of Russia. Used for pasture and hay in the northern Great Plains, west to Washington, south to Colorado and Kansas. Adapted to areas of 15 or more inches of annual precipitation; has grown in elevations up to 10,000 feet. Good persistence drought tolerance and winter hardiness. Produces good hay yields, grows well with alfalfa, suitable for erosion control. On well drained, fertile soils with ample moisture will grow to 6 feet. Hay yields are high, makes excellent pasture from early spring to late summer. Easily established, grows rapidly. Not as winter hardy as crested wheatgrass. Difficult to maintain stands more than 6 years.

Seed count: 83,000 to 95,000 seeds per pound

Seeding rate: 12 to 15 pounds per acre

Seeding time: March 15 to May 15

Germination: about 14 days

Mature height: 30 to 60 inches

Effective annual precipitation needed: 15 inches

PUBESCENT WHEATGRASS (Agropyron trichophorum): cool season sod forming perennial grass closely related to intermediate wheatgrass. The two are similar in growth habit, period of growth, and most characteristics, differing in that the heads and seeds of pubescent wheatgrass are covered with short, stiff hairs which suggest the name "Stiff hair wheatgrass." Pubescent wheatgrass may be more drought tolerant than intermediate wheatgrass. Used for permanent seedings on rangeland. Needs a minimum of 12 inches of rainfall below 3,500 feet elevation.

Seed count: 80,000 to 100,000 seeds per pound

Seeding rate: 12 to 15 pounds per acre

Seeding time: March 15 to May 15

Germination: about 14 days

Mature height: 28 to 50 inches

Effective annual precipitation needed: 12 inches

SIBERIAN WHEATGRASS (Agropyron sibericum): Drought resistant cool season bunchgrass introduced from Russia in 1934. Valuable in areas with 9 to 15 inches of rainfall. Starts growth early in the spring. Closely related to crested wheatgrass and is similar in appearance; stems are finer and seed head narrower. Slightly more drought tolerant than crested wheatgrass, better suited o sandy or coarse textured soils. Produces more forage in arid climates and on heavy soils than crested wheatgrass. Hardy plant, used for pasture, hay and erosion control. Area of adaptation is that of crested wheatgrass. Long lived; tolerates heavy grazing, but not flooding.

Seed count: 170,000 to 250,000 seeds per pound

Seeding rate: 6 to 8 pounds per acre

Seeding time: March 15 to May 15

Germination: 12 to 18 days

Mature height: 8 to 24 inches

TALL WHEATGRASS (Agropyron elongatum): A tall, coarse, long lived, late maturing bunchgrass used for hay and pasture primarily in the northern Great Plains and the intermountain region. Can be grown on wet, alkaline and saline soils; is used extensively for reclamation of these soils; has good seedling vigor. Not as drought resistant as crested wheatgrass. Produces high yields, but not as palatable as most Wheatgrasses. Makes fair hay, can be used for silage. Does not withstand close grazing.

Seed count: 65,000 to 79,000 seeds per pound

Seeding rate: 14 to 15 pounds per acre

Seeding times: march 15 to May 15

Germination: 12 to 18 days, slow to start.

Mature height: 30 to 60 inches

Effective annual precipitation needed: 12 to 14 inches

Questions? Contact info@baileyseed.com

 
About Us Contact Us Wholesale Information Seed Information Retail Sales FAQ's NTEP Data